The 2016—Bow Valley Riparian Recovery and Enhancement Program—Sets Record

Stream Tender Magazine

December 2016 Issue

A West Nose Creek

Young of The Year

Brown Trout

This Web Magazine is formatted to be viewed on a Computer Screen

Program Partners

Cochrane Community Grant Program 2016

Articles by : Guy Woods and Contributors

Why is this West Nose Creek Brown Trout So Important?

Above: This juvenile brown trout was caught by fly fishing on the West Nose Creek in August of this year. The small trout was a hatchling from the 2015 spawning season on the creek. It is approximately 80 mm in length, which corresponds to the average length of brown trout that have emerged from the gravel spawning beds in the early spring and grown to this size by late August. This small brown is important because it confirms the successful incubation of some of the trout eggs from the 2015 spawning season.

“Just because trout have been documented as actively spawning in a stream, this doesn’t mean that all or some of the eggs will successfully incubate and hatch”

“ Last Year’s Riparian Plantings — Update”

Above: This 2016 photo shows native willow plants that were planted in 2015 along West Nose Creek. Many of the willows are reaching out over the water and will soon provide overhead cover for the fish in the stream. The planting continued on the creek in 2016.

    This year’s 2016 BVRR&E Program sets a new record for the number of native willow and tree plants, with a total planting of 16,425. An accumulated 510 volunteer person hours of hard work resulted in planting along approximately 15 kilometres of stream bank. 

    Over the past few years, since the program was first started in 2014, a sum total of 41,725 native plants have been put into the ground along the stream banks of Bighill Creek, West Nose Creek and Nose Creek. This partnership program has accomplished a lot in 3 years.

 2016 — Fall Spawning Update For The Bighill Creek System

Above: This pair of spawning brook trout, hug the stream bank on Millennium Creek, at one of the spawning habitats that were created during the stream restoration program in 2005—2008. Every year brook trout return to this particular site to lay down their eggs and recruit a new generation of brook trout into the Bighill Creek system.

2016 Volunteer Support Was Substantial

Above: Come rain or shine, volunteers turned out to get the job done. This year’s riparian planting volunteer contribution totalled out at 510 volunteer hours. Some of the volunteers showed up for multiple planting events. It was nice to be planting with individuals that share an interest in the riparian restoration program.

Below: The beautiful color of spawning brook trout on Ranch House Spring Creek this fall was captivating;  I could not pass up the opportunity to take some photos and video.

" Happy Holidays "

West Nose Creek Spawning 2016  -  More Great News

Above: This spawning male brown trout was captured on film, while resting over a redd or egg nest, on West Nose Creek this fall. The female was still hiding upstream after I spooked the trout, on my approach. This trout was approximately 22 inches in length.

“Great Fly Fishing Season on the Bow River”

Below: Fly Fisherman Robert Scollie holds up a beautiful brown, caught on the Bow River.

Photo:  Robert Scollie

   BVR&E Program Growing in Recognition

    The Bow Valley Riparian Recovery and Enhancement Program is slowly growing recognition both nationally and internationally. This is great news for a grass roots partnership program in our neck of the woods.

    The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada featured the program’s success in an article published on their website this year.

    You can review it at: http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pnw-ppe/rfcpp-ppcpr/success-succes-eng.html . The Society for Ecological Restoration also featured an article on their website based out of Washington, D.C. at: http://chapter.ser.org/westerncanada/restoration-showcase/restoration-showcase-alberta/ .

    This was great to see and it is also good for our program’s future. It is my hope that we can continue to carry on in our efforts to restore the riparian zone on a number of area streams. Being recognized for our efforts helps to boost everyone’s hard work.

 

 

Pages

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

In This Issue

Page

10